Piikuni Blackfeet Artists Exhibit

Stumptown Art Studio is hosting an art exhibition featuring a group of Piikuni Blackfeet artists from East Glacier, Browning and the vicinity. An opening reception for the show is on Thursday, September 1 from 6-9 p.m. and is part of the Whitefish Gallery Night.

Pieces ranging from painting, photography and printmaking to mixed media sculptures and beadwork will be on display through the month until October 1.  Stumptown Art Studio, located at 145 Central Avenue in Whitefish is open 7 days a week to view the exhibit, Monday –Saturday from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays from noon -5 p.m.

Teri Loring Dahl is exhibiting paintings and photographs that are inspired from the horse and buffalo cultures of the past.  She has travelled millions of miles, going to all the large Indian celebrations and rodeos in the United States and Canada for her images.

Blackfeet-Assiniboine artist David Dragonfly attended the Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe and received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting from the University of Missoula.  The main influences for Dragonfly’s widely shown printmaking are his native cultures and the beautiful landscapes of the Blackfeet Reservation and the State of Montana.

Browning artist Valentina LaPier shares the landscape of her heart through her painted images, weaving together her life as an artist.  Her artwork has become a vehicle by which she educates both Native and non-Native people around the world on the history of the different tribal images used in her work.

Artist Lindy Racine finds peace in the outdoors and tries to bring some of that tranquility and beauty into her acrylic paintings.  Her artwork often brings together the aspects of the natural world and imagery from her Native American heritage.

Growing up on the Blackfeet Reservation in Montana, Sammy Jo Bird was raised with the “ponoka’o’mitta” (Blackfeet for horse).  She has always had a close relationship with the horse which has played a huge role in her art and in her life.  Sammy Jo says, “The drive and passion behind my art is not only my love for animals but my love for people.  I want my paintings to help people, make people smile and make a positive statement.”

Also joining in the Piikuni Blackfeet exhibit are other artists.  Among them, Frank Stands-at-the-Door, who is known for his doll making and mixed media work.  Staying connected to family and culture, and keeping that culture alive is important to Jim Watts, maker of drums and walking sticks.  Storytelling through beading is artistically portrayed by Angel Potts and Kimberly Bear Medicine.  Finding ways for the Native American people to come together, keeping the culture alive and telling their stories is a common thread for these artists.